(via twograms)

Yeah today is okay. #morelikethisplease

Yeah today is okay. #morelikethisplease

#spring #again

#spring #again

gobookyourself:

Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

For more unique dystopian visions of the future, try these…

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess for a violent future Britain where the establishment seeks order by reforming dangerous youth.

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow for a 1984-inspired YA thriller set in the near future that explores the dystopian effect of post 9/11 policy.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel for a literary love letter to humanity after a flu pandemic wipes out 99% of the population.

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell for a genre-busting epic that starts in 1984 and ends in 2043.

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choosechoice:

And they say rape culture doesn’t exist. That rapists don’t need to be taught not to rape…

choosechoice:

And they say rape culture doesn’t exist. That rapists don’t need to be taught not to rape…

(via likeneelyohara)

projectunbreakable:

A friend of mine shared this post on Twitter today about something one of her friend’s witnessed in NYC last night, and I felt it was important for us to post it on here - as a way of both getting the word out and seeing if anyone has any way of helping the situation (blogging, writing an article, knowledge of a missing person, etc.) Please share if you can - there has to be something we can do to help. It is possible to get in touch with the original source - please first email it to projectunbreakable@gmail.com and we will forward it to her. 

(via time--to-get-fit)

(via likeneelyohara)

meloromantics:

bobthewitch:

Hate to break it, but this is more done by other women than men.
Guys are mostly differently awful.

there are mountains of research backing up the fact that advertisers and media prey on women’s insecurities
like the rest of media ]and the world, basically], the ad industry is run by men. so is the beauty industry [the ceo’s of elizabeth arden, l’oreal, ulta, revlon, paul mitchell, nars, the miss universe pageant and several others are men].
men are the driving force behind media that is toxic to women and they are the ones who profit off of it.
on the ground, it may appear that women are the ones doing this to each other. that is a result of internalized misogyny, which women at times perpetuate due to the pressure to perform in a patriarchal society.
but do not think for a moment that women are behind this entire industry. do not think that women are the reason for this, do not think that women profit off of this, and do not think that mothers want this for their daughters.

meloromantics:

bobthewitch:

Hate to break it, but this is more done by other women than men.

Guys are mostly differently awful.

  1. there are mountains of research backing up the fact that advertisers and media prey on women’s insecurities
  2. like the rest of media ]and the world, basically], the ad industry is run by men. so is the beauty industry [the ceo’s of elizabeth arden, l’oreal, ulta, revlon, paul mitchell, nars, the miss universe pageant and several others are men].

men are the driving force behind media that is toxic to women and they are the ones who profit off of it.

on the ground, it may appear that women are the ones doing this to each other. that is a result of internalized misogyny, which women at times perpetuate due to the pressure to perform in a patriarchal society.

but do not think for a moment that women are behind this entire industry. do not think that women are the reason for this, do not think that women profit off of this, and do not think that mothers want this for their daughters.

(Source: audreyplaza, via likeneelyohara)

micdotcom:

19 #WhyIStayed tweets everyone needs to see

While many cheered the NFL’s move to (finally) punish Rice’s vicious behavior, too many media outlets immediately fell into a tired pattern of victim blaming. 

Writer Beverly Gooden had heard enough. “I was watching the responses to the TMZ on my timeline, and I noticed a trend. People were asking ‘why did she marry him?’ and ‘why didn’t she leave him,’” Gooden told Mic. “When I saw those tweets, my first reaction was shame. The same shame that I felt back when I was in a violent marriage. It’s a sort of guilt that would make me crawl into a shell and remain silent. But today, for a reason I can’t explain, I’d had enough. I knew I had an answer to everyone’s question of why victims of violence stay. I can’t speak for Janay Rice, I can only speak for me.”

Gooden decided to change the conversation. Follow micdotcom

littlealienproducts:

Spotted Eyes Planter // $50

littlealienproducts:

Spotted Eyes Planter // $50

(via acerrbus)

latitudinaltales:

Latitudinal Tales, Tasmania on Flickr.

latitudinaltales:

Latitudinal Tales, Tasmania on Flickr.

(via farsouthern)

just. 

just don’t move house. not ever. don’t do it. it’s not worth it. 

you will get screwed over by everyone and their dog and end up sitting in your cold, dark living room with no internet or electricity, wondering why fridges are so damned expensive. 

bloomandglow:

Finally had some time to take pics of our plant project.

Succulent + Cacti, lovingly arranged by hand and accented with Italian sea glass + terra cotta from the Amalfi Coast.

(via rainbrolly)

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.

These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.

Yeah.

They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.

These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.

And the metro is always this clean.

In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.

Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.

We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

(via rainbrolly)

Today is World Sexual Health Day

sexologist:

Today is World Sexual Health Day, a day to advocate and celebrate sexual well-being.image

The World Health Organization, as well as the organizers of WSHD, the World Association for Sexual Health, define sexual health as follows:

Sexual health is a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled. 

Just yesterday I was responding to speaking requests from colleges and universities. It struck me that again and again, the requests were for “The Female Orgasm”, a program on the right to seek sexual pleasure, “Sex: Am I Normal?”, a program that advocates for showing compassion and refraining from judgement about the sexual diversity that exists among humans, and “Virgins and Sluts”, a program on why attempts to control free expression of sexuality is damaging.

What I have not gotten a request for is “Safer and Sexy”, my safe sex/condoms/STI workshop. 5 years ago, 90% of my speaking requests at colleges were for workshops on sexuality as a health hazard. Now 90% of the requests are for workshops on sexuality as a social justice issue; the right to pursue pleasure, the right to exist without sexual violence, the right to not face discrimination and cruelty because of your sexuality.

Growing up, sexuality, if ever discussed (in school, by politicians, on the news, etc) was always discussed from a one-dimensional deficit model; sexuality is a problem (it can kill you!), and sex ed aims to give you some tools to not die. Starting out as a young sexologist, I promoted a new paradigm for sexuality education; sex should be fun, pleasure is good for you, free expression of one’s sexuality is a vital part of being human, and everyone has the right to enjoy their sexuality without fear of violence.

My idea was that preventing disease was about 1% of what it meant to me to be a sexual person, but the rest got ignored with the deficit model of sex education. Sexuality is a complex interaction of the body, mind, and social domains that change and evolve throughout the life cycle. It’s not all bad; some of the best physical joys the body can experience and emotional highs are related to sex. It’s not all good either; there has been so much suffering and exploitation tied in with sexuality. It’s just… human, and I believe should be acknowledged and celebrated as such.

The fact that there is now such a thing as World Sexual Health Day, and that it acknowledges “sexual health” as so much deeper than just disease prevention, and the fact that I’m getting asked to speak on sexual pleasure and justice instead of gonorrhea, leaves me optimistic that that paradigm shift from sex education = disease prevention education to sex education = social justice education is actually happening. It’s not happening on its own, of course. A lot of people worked really hard for a really hard time for these changes to begin to be felt. But it’s happening, and that is something to celebrate on World Sexual Health Day.